7/29/2021

Dolphins Getting High On Pufferfishjosh's Pancake

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Dolphins have a reputation for being happy friendly animals, partly due to their incredible intelligence and Flipper-like portrayal in the media. We’ve already exposed that dolphins are capable of being gigantic jerks and have even been witnessed using a dead fish as a masturbatory tool (highly NSFW video), but now it appears that these underwater deviants also get high recreationally from a potentially lethal source.

Dolphins have been observed not only apparently getting high off of their fellow ocean dwelling neighbors the pufferfish, but passing the small fish amongst themselves as they partake. Footage of this interesting act can be seen in the BBC documentary series Dolphin: Spy in the Pod. According to Zoologist Rob Pilley, it was the first time dolphins getting high off pufferfish was caught on film. June 21, 2011 In: Uncategorized This post may have affiliate links, which means I may receive commissions if you choose to purchase through links I provide (at no extra cost to you). Scientists were amazed at footage of the mammals apparently getting “high” with the help of a toxic puffer fish. In an extraordinary scene filmed for a new TV series, the dolphins are shown.

Dolphins get high on pufferfish

Emmy award-winning filmmaker John Downer was filming the upcoming two-part miniseries Dolphins: Spy in the Pod when he noticed that bottlenose dolphins would gently chew on a pufferfish and then pass it to another dolphin in the pod. He noticed that after chewing on the pufferfish, the dolphins would look very tranquil and dazed. Then it hit him: these dolphins were getting high on the nerve toxin released by the pufferfish.

If his prior knowledge of pufferfish toxin wasn’t an indication of what these dolphins were doing, their subsequent behavior was a dead giveaway. They spent a great deal of time observing their own reflection on the water’s surface and acting very strange in general.

Dolphins Purposely 'getting High' On Pufferfish

Downer’s crew was able to get this inside look through creative spy cameras, similar to what has been used for many of his other documentary miniseries. Underwater shots were taken with fish-shaped cameras while above water shots were taken with a camera that looks like a inconspicuous sea turtle. With the dolphins surrounded by cameras that looked like normal, everyday sea creatures, they were more relaxed and exhibited behavior that may not have been captured with traditional filming techniques.

Episode 1 of Dolphins: Spy in the Pod will premiere Thursday on BBC One at 8:00 pm UTC. The dolphins getting high on pufferfish toxin will be shown on Episode 2, which will air on January 9.

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Extraordinary scenes filmed for new documentary showing the marine mammals in their natural habitats

By Adam Withnall

(Independent)

Dolphins are thought of as one of the most intelligent species in the animal kingdom – and experts believe they have put their ingenuity to use in the pursuit of getting “high”.

In extraordinary scenes filmed for a new documentary, young dolphins were seen carefully manipulating a certain kind of puffer fish which, if provoked, releases a nerve toxin.

Though large doses of the toxin can be deadly, in small amounts it is known to produce a narcotic effect, and the dolphins appeared to have worked out how to make the fish release just the right amount.

Carefully chewing on the puffer and passing it between one another, the marine mammals then enter what seems to be a trance-like state.

The behaviour was captured on camera by the makers of Dolphins: Spy in the Pod, a series produced for BBC One by the award-winning wildlife documentary producer John Downer.

Dolphins purposely Pufferfishjosh

Rob Pilley, a zoologist who also worked as a producer on the series, told the Sunday Times: “This was a case of young dolphins purposely experimenting with something we know to be intoxicating.

“After chewing the puffer gently and passing it round, they began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection.

“It reminded us of that craze a few years ago when people started licking toads to get a buzz, especially the way they hung there in a daze afterwards. It was the most extraordinary thing to see.”

Dolphins are thought of as one of the most intelligent species in the animal kingdom – and experts believe they have put their ingenuity to use in the pursuit of getting “high”.

In extraordinary scenes filmed for a new documentary, young dolphins were seen carefully manipulating a certain kind of puffer fish which, if provoked, releases a nerve toxin.

Though large doses of the toxin can be deadly, in small amounts it is known to produce a narcotic effect, and the dolphins appeared to have worked out how to make the fish release just the right amount. Review usubstitutionap calculus 2.

Pufferfish

Carefully chewing on the puffer and passing it between one another, the marine mammals then enter what seems to be a trance-like state.

The behaviour was captured on camera by the makers of Dolphins: Spy in the Pod, a series produced for BBC One by the award-winning wildlife documentary producer John Downer.

Rob Pilley, a zoologist who also worked as a producer on the series, told the Sunday Times: “This was a case of young dolphins purposely experimenting with something we know to be intoxicating.

“After chewing the puffer gently and passing it round, they began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection.

Dolphin Getting High On Pufferfish

“It reminded us of that craze a few years ago when people started licking toads to get a buzz, especially the way they hung there in a daze afterwards. It was the most extraordinary thing to see.”

The documentary makers used spy cameras hidden in fake turtles, fish and squid to film 900 hours of footage showing dolphins in their natural habitats.

Dolphins Getting High On Pufferfish

The scenes showing them “using” puffer fish will feature in the second episode of the series, which starts on Thursday.

Dolphins Get High On Pufferfish

It is the latest in a long run of wildlife documentaries made by Downer which use similar spy camera techniques. Previous series include Penguins: Spy in the Huddle, which like the Dolphins programme was narrated by David Tennant, Elephants: Spy in the Herd with David Attenborough and Lions: Spy in the Den.

Downer said: “The spy creatures were designed to infiltrate the dolphins’ hidden lives by looking like the marine creatures a dolphin might encounter in their everyday lives.”

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