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The Last Of Us American Dreams Downloadscriptdwnload

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The Last of Us: American Dreams
The front cover of the first issue of The Last of Us: American Dreams, with artwork by Julian Totino Tedesco. The covers were designed to bridge the realistic look of the game and the stylized look of the comic.[1]
Publication information
PublisherDark Horse Comics
FormatLimited series
Genre
Publication date3 April– 31 July 2013
No. of issues4
Main character(s)Ellie
Creative team
Written byNeil Druckmann
Faith Erin Hicks
Artist(s)Faith Erin Hicks
Letterer(s)Clem Robins
Colorist(s)Rachelle Rosenberg
Editor(s)Rachel Edidin
Brendan Wright
  1. Last Of Us: American Dreams [Episode 2] Motion Comic - YouTube
  2. American Dreams #4
  3. Cached

The Last of Us: American Dreams is a four-issue comic book series based on the video game The Last of Us. It was written by Last of Us creative director Neil Druckmann and cartoonist Faith Erin Hicks, with illustrations by Hicks and coloring by Rachelle Rosenberg. The series was published by Dark Horse Comics between April and July 2013, and a collected edition was published in October 2013.

Reverse free flash games download. The following is a category page for the Dark Horse miniseries, The Last of Us: American Dreams. The Last of Us: American Dreams #1 - Kindle edition by Hicks, Faith Erin, Druckman, Neil, Hicks, Faith Erin. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Last of Us: American Dreams #1.

  • Oct 30, 2013 The Last of Us: American Dreams TPB Nineteen years ago, a parasitic fungal outbreak killed the majority of the world s population, forcing survivors into a handful of quarantine zones.
  • Overall, American Dreams does not tell an amazing story, but it is a nice little companion to The Last of Us, especially Left Behind. If you have no interest in playing the DLC, then you're missing nothing by skipping this graphic novel. I would say this is a book only for those looking for a nice little addition to The Last of Us.
  • See full list on thelastofus.fandom.com.

Like the game, the comic is set in a post-apocalyptic United States, overrun by zombie-like creatures infected by a mutated strain of the Cordyceps fungus. The comics serve as a prequel to the game, chronicling the journey of the young Ellie and her meeting with another young survivor, Riley Abel. Druckmann chose Ellie as the focus of the comic due to the uniqueness of her birth and upbringing in the post-apocalyptic world. Hicks joined the project after discovering Ellie's role in the game, considering her an unusual character to include in a survival horror game. The comic's art style is different than the game art—a choice from Hicks to give the comic a unique feel and identity.

The series received generally positive reviews. Critics particularly praised Druckmann's writing and character development, as well as the simplicity of Hicks' illustrations. The series was also a commercial success, with some issues requiring reprinting due to high demand.

Publication history[edit]

Neil Druckmann (left), creative director of The Last of Us, wrote the story for American Dreams in collaboration with artist Faith Erin Hicks (right).

Dark Horse Comics approached creative director Neil Druckmann, who was working on The Last of Us, to produce a tie-in comic book series for the game. Druckmann was initially wary of the idea, but eventually agreed when he realized Dark Horse 'didn't want to do something tangential' with the opportunity of expanding their characters and universe beyond the game.[2] Work on the comic began during the game's development, which allowed the stories of the two projects to integrate, and influence each other. Druckmann requested webcomic artist Faith Erin Hicks as a collaborator on the project, after reading her comic Friends with Boys (2012) and appreciating 'how personal it felt'.[3] He also felt that Hicks could capture the 'gritty' feel of the game.[1] Hicks then sent some concept art to Dark Horse as a pitch for the job; they accepted, and she became officially involved with the project.[4] Hicks was drawn to the project after reading about the character of Ellie in the game's script; she considered Ellie an unusual character to include in a survival horror game, calling her a 'tough teenage girl who wasn't sexualized, and who seemed very much the equal of her male counterpart'.[3] Hicks was given access to various gameplay sequences and the game's script during development, to allow her to better understand the story. She was also given videos of the actors performing on set, which was helpful when illustrating the characters. 'I get a look at these characters and I see them interacting as human beings, not just as concept art,' said Hicks.[5]

Ellie's backstory was originally intended to fit as a gameplay sequence within The Last of Us, but this was ultimately scrapped. When Dark Horse approached Naughty Dog with the idea of a comic book, Druckmann had the opportunity to tell the story.[4] Druckmann found that Ellie was the ideal main character for the comic due to her birth and upbringing; while characters like Joel mostly lived in the world before the outbreak, Ellie is unaware of life prior to the outbreak. This created an interesting idea for Druckmann, who became intrigued with discovering the effects of everyday actions in a post-apocalyptic world.[5] Hicks enjoyed writing American Dreams, particularly due to the humor featured in the comic. Druckmann allowed Hicks to design the character of Riley, including her physical appearance, characteristics, and most of her dialogue. 'It felt like a good way to split it, where [Hicks] would own Riley and I would own Ellie,' said Druckmann.[6] When creating the comic's art style, Hicks avoided replicating the game art, instead opting to 'draw it in [her] own style and to the best of [her] ability'.[5] She felt that the art style is slightly 'cartoony', which is partially due to Ellie's young age.[5] 'If [the comic] was hyper-realistic and super-rendered, I think it would undermine the story we're trying to tell', said Hicks.[5] When designing the character Angel Knives for the comic's second issue, Hicks was inspired by the style of the characters from the Mortal Kombat series.[6]

Last Of Us: American Dreams [Episode 2] Motion Comic - YouTube

The first issue of the comic was published on April 3, 2013,[7] and a reprint became available on May 29;[8] the second issue was also published on May 29,[9] followed by the third issue on June 26,[10] and the fourth issue on July 31.[11] All four issues were republished in a collected edition as a single package on October 30, 2013.[12]

The Last Of Us American Dreams Downloadscriptdwnload

Plot[edit]

At the Boston quarantine zone, Ellie becomes caught in a fight with a group of boys who attempt to steal her belongings. Riley Abel steps in to break up the fight, beating one of the boys and making the others flee. Ellie becomes angered by this, claiming that she can take care of herself.[13] Riley then advises Ellie to flee, but the latter is caught and assigned to cleaning duty. While she is completing the chore, she realizes that Riley stole her Walkman,[14] and later demands that she return it, which Riley reluctantly does.[15]

At night, Ellie catches Riley attempting to sneak out of the school, and demands to accompany her.[16] Riley reluctantly agrees, and the two make their way to the mall, where they meet Riley's friend Winston.[17] As Winston teaches Ellie how to ride a horse, Riley steals his radio, and discovers that an attack by the Fireflies—a rebel group opposing the quarantine zone authorities—has occurred nearby.[18] Ellie and Riley make their way to the attack, and find that the Fireflies are wounded and outnumbered. To help, Ellie and Riley throw smoke grenades at the military, allowing the Fireflies to retreat safely.[19] They are spotted by the military, and escape into a nearby alley, where they narrowly avoid being bitten by an Infected—zombie-like creatures infected by a mutated strain of the Cordyceps fungus.[20]

The girls are soon captured by Fireflies, who restrain them; Marlene, the leader of the Fireflies, recognizes Ellie, and demands that she remain safe.[21] When Riley claims she would like to join their group,[22] Marlene refuses, and the two argue, resulting in Marlene threatening to shoot Riley.[23] Ellie intervenes, demanding at gunpoint that Marlene explain how she knows information about Ellie. When Ellie finally lowers the gun, Marlene informs her that she knew Ellie's mother, and had promised her that she would take care of Ellie.[24] Ellie hands the gun to Marlene, who says that she would tell her more about her mother in the future, before telling the girls to leave.[25] When Ellie and Riley reenter the quarantine zone, Riley says that there is no escape. Ellie suggests running away, but Riley informs her that this will just result in death. The two then walk back into the school.[26]

Reception[edit]

The comic's artwork, with illustrations by Faith Erin Hicks, was praised for its simplicity.

The Last of Us: American Dreams received generally positive reviews. Praise was particularly directed at the story and artwork of the comic, which were said to complement each other.[27] The comic was also a commercial success; the first issue sold out, and the resulting high demand led to Dark Horse reissuing the installment.[8]

The comic's story received positive reactions. Lonnie Nadler of Bloody Disgusting felt unsure about the story in the first two issues due to their dedication to character development,[28] but praised the final issue for delivering 'authentic drama and raw intensity' which was missing from previous issues.[29]IGN's Jesse Schedeen felt that the story served to enhance the world and characters,[30] and later praised the comic's availability to readers who had not played the game.[27] Conversely, Nathan Butler of Invisible Gamer felt that the introduction and development of the first two issues could have been shortened, and that the final issue attempted to include too much content, ultimately calling the comic a 'sub-par attempt at a video game tie-in series'.[31]

Reviewers also praised the comic's artwork. Alasdair Stuart of SciFiNow wrote that the art was 'so expressive and relaxed', naming Hicks 'one of the best artists of her generation'.[32] Jen Bosier of Forbes felt that the art style worked well within the context of the story,[33] and IGN's Schedeen felt that the comic heavily relied on the artwork, and that its art style gave it a unique 'style and identity'.[27] Nadler of Bloody Disgusting called it 'quite simplistic, but very clean',[28] and 'visually expressive when it matters',[29] comparing it to Scott Pilgrim.[28] Nadler also praised the choice of color, stating that it contained 'the right palette of dark and murkey hues', as well as the cover artwork, calling it 'consistently stunning'.[34] Jennifer Cheng of Comic Book Resources also wrote that the colors fit with the setting of the comic.[35] Peter Jubinsky of Geeks of Doom particularly praised Hicks' depiction of the Infected as 'in pain and desperate', calling this 'especially harrowing'.[36]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abDruckmann, Neil; Straley, Bruce (June 2013). The Art of The Last of Us. United States of America: Dark Horse Comics. p. 172. ISBN978-1616551643.
  2. ^Cheng, Jennifer (October 13, 2012). 'NYCC: Neil Druckman, Faith Erin Hicks & Dark Horse Introduce 'The Last of Us''. Comic Book Resources. Boiling Point Productions. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  3. ^ abHudson, Laura (August 6, 2013). 'See 15 Pages of the Last of Us Prequel Comic — And How It Influenced the Game'. Wired. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  4. ^ abNguyen, John (April 18, 2013). 'The Last of Us: American Dreams – Interview with Faith Erin Hicks and Neil Druckmann'. Nerd Reactor. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  5. ^ abcdeSchedeen, Jesse (April 9, 2013). 'Expanding the Saga of The Last of Us'. IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  6. ^ abHudson, Laura (February 18, 2014). 'Inside the Mind Behind the Brilliant New Last of Us DLC'. Wired. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  7. ^'The Last of Us: American Dreams #1'. Dark Horse Comics. April 3, 2013. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved July 4, 2015.
  8. ^ ab'The Last of Us: American Dreams #1 Sells Out!'. Dark Horse Comics. May 1, 2013. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved October 10, 2014.
  9. ^'The Last of Us: American Dreams #2'. Dark Horse Comics. May 29, 2013. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved July 4, 2015.
  10. ^'The Last of Us: American Dreams #3'. Dark Horse Comics. June 26, 2013. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved July 4, 2015.
  11. ^'The Last of Us: American Dreams #4'. Dark Horse Comics. July 31, 2013. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved July 4, 2015.
  12. ^'The Last of Us: American Dreams TPB'. Dark Horse Comics. October 30, 2013. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved July 4, 2015.
  13. ^Druckmann, Hicks & April 2013, pp. 7–10
  14. ^Druckmann, Hicks & April 2013, pp. 11–15
  15. ^Druckmann, Hicks & April 2013, pp. 18–19
  16. ^Druckmann, Hicks & April 2013, pp. 20–21
  17. ^Druckmann, Hicks & May 2013, p. 12
  18. ^Druckmann, Hicks & May 2013, p. 22
  19. ^Druckmann, Hicks & June 2013, pp. 5–6
  20. ^Druckmann, Hicks & June 2013, pp. 8–17
  21. ^Druckmann, Hicks & June 2013, pp. 22–23
  22. ^Druckmann, Hicks & July 2013, p. 6
  23. ^Druckmann, Hicks & July 2013, pp. 12–14
  24. ^Druckmann, Hicks & July 2013, pp. 15–17
  25. ^Druckmann, Hicks & July 2013, p. 18
  26. ^Druckmann, Hicks & July 2013, pp. 20–22
  27. ^ abcSchedeen, Jesse (July 31, 2013). 'The Last of Us: American Dreams #4 Review'. IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  28. ^ abcNadler, Lonnie (May 30, 2013). 'Review: 'The Last of Us: American Dreams' # 2'. Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  29. ^ abNadler, Lonnie (August 1, 2013). 'Review: 'The Last of Us: American Dreams' #4'. Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  30. ^Schedeen, Jesse (May 29, 2013). 'The Last of Us: American Dreams #2 Review'. IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  31. ^Butler, Nathan (August 6, 2013). 'The Last of Us: American Dreams #1-4 Comic Review'. Invisible Gamer. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  32. ^Stuart, Alasdair (March 7, 2014). 'The Last Of Us: American Dreams graphic novel review'. SciFiNow. Imagine Publishing. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  33. ^Bosier, Jen (April 6, 2013). 'The Last of Us: American Dreams #1 Comic Review'. Forbes. Forbes, Inc. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  34. ^Nadler, Lonnie (June 27, 2013). 'Review: 'The Last of Us: American Dreams' #3'. Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  35. ^Cheng, Jennifer (April 5, 2013). 'Review: The Last of Us: American Dreams #1'. Comic Book Resources. Boiling Point Productions. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  36. ^Jubinsky, Peter (November 6, 2013). 'Comic Review: The Last Of Us: American Dreams'. Geeks of Doom. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015.

Issues[edit]

  • Druckmann, Neil, Hicks, Faith Erin (w), Hicks, Faith Erin (a), Rosenberg, Rachelle (col), Robins, Clem (let), Edidin, Rachel, Wright, Brendan (ed). The Last of Us: American Dreams #1 (April 3, 2013), Dark Horse Comics
  • Druckmann, Neil, Hicks, Faith Erin (w), Hicks, Faith Erin (a), Rosenberg, Rachelle (col), Robins, Clem (let), Edidin, Rachel, Wright, Brendan (ed). The Last of Us: American Dreams #2 (May 29, 2013), Dark Horse Comics
  • Druckmann, Neil, Hicks, Faith Erin (w), Hicks, Faith Erin (a), Rosenberg, Rachelle (col), Robins, Clem (let), Edidin, Rachel, Wright, Brendan (ed). The Last of Us: American Dreams #3 (June 26, 2013), Dark Horse Comics
  • Druckmann, Neil, Hicks, Faith Erin (w), Hicks, Faith Erin (a), Rosenberg, Rachelle (col), Robins, Clem (let), Edidin, Rachel, Wright, Brendan (ed). The Last of Us: American Dreams #4 (July 31, 2013), Dark Horse Comics

External links[edit]

  • The Last of Us: American Dreams at the Grand Comics Database
  • The Last of Us: American Dreams at the Comic Book DB (archived from the original)
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Last_of_Us:_American_Dreams&oldid=968679910'
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The comics-exclusive prequel to the new game from Naughty Dog! Creativedirector Neil Druckmann teams with breakout comics star Faith Erin Hicks topresent the story of thirteen-year-old Ellie's life in a violent, postpandemicworld. A newcomer at a military boarding school, Ellie is reluctant to toe theline, which earns her new enemies—and her first glimpse of the world outside.

• Must-read tie-in to the upcoming release from Naughty Dog!

• Coscripted by The Last of Us creative director Neil Druckmann.

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Creators

Writers:
Faith Erin Hicks, Neil Druckmann
Artist:
Faith Erin Hicks
Colorist:
Rachelle Rosenberg
Cover Artist:
Julian Totino Tedesco
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Creators

Writers:
Faith Erin Hicks, Neil Druckmann
Artist:
Faith Erin Hicks
Colorist:
Rachelle Rosenberg
Cover Artist:
Julian Totino Tedesco
Publisher:
Dark Horse Comics
Genres:
Release date:
April 10, 2013
American Dreams

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The Art of the Last of Us